A Response of Peace: The Faith of the Coptic Church in the Face of Suffering

MariahHeron_The_Faith_of_the_Coptic_Church_in_the_Face_of_Suffering.pngAs the Coptic Church remembers its modern-day martyrs on the 15th of February each year, it is an honor to share this guest post by Mariah Heron, whose story evinces the early Church apologist Tertullian’s remark: “The blood of martyrs is the seed of the Church.”

Guest post by Mariah Heron

The brilliant Christian writer of the twentieth century, G.K. Chesterton was once asked, along with other literary figures, what book he would choose to have if stranded on a deserted island? Instead of the well-rehearsed request for a Bible, Chesterton replied, “Well a guide to practical shipbuilding of course!” The story in its simplicity brings humor because, in all truthfulness, one would also want a guide to ease the mind and heart in such a trial. Continue reading

From Orange Jumpsuits to White Robes

Guest post by my wife Suzy Tawfik

Artwork by: Wael Mories

Artwork by: Wael Mories

“And they cried with a loud voice, saying, “How long, O Lord, holy and true, until You judge and avenge our blood on those who dwell on the earth?”  Then a white robe was given to each of them; and it was said to them that they should rest a little while longer, until both the number of their fellow servants and their brethren, who would be killed as they were, was completed.” -Revelation 6:10-11

Take up your cross and follow Me

Immediately upon hearing that my fellow Copts were beheaded, the humanity within me reacted with anger and frustration, tired of the innocent bloodshed, the pain, and the emotional turmoil. In the words of Tertullian (3rd Century),

“If the martyrs of the whole world were put on one arm of the balance and the martyrs of Egypt on the other, the balance would tilt in favor of the Egyptians.”

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Before Terrorism, There Was Rome—for Christians, Just More of the Same

Before Terrorism There Was Rome

As the world watches in horror and dismay at the brutality displayed by modern-day terrorists, I cannot help but think to put this in perspective and recall to memory the slew of Christians who suffered similarly (or arguably worse) under the Roman Empire. Continue reading