My Intriguing Visit to an Ethiopian Orthodox Church—A First-Time Coptic Visitor’s Perspective

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What a remarkable experience I had visiting the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church! A friend of mine gave my name to an Ethiopian Orthodox priest, suggesting that I give the after-church sermon to the youth. He invited me to attend the service, which I did, and by the end of it I had so many questions I wanted answered due to all the intriguing things I witnessed! Here are all the fascinating things I learned, and my observations upon further reflection:

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Corporate / Work Life and Christianity: The Delicate Balance for Succeeding in Both in Light of “Treasure Sunday.”

CorporateWorkLifeandChristianPursuits.pngEver since I left working for the government as a public defender and a prosecutor (for 7 years) and entered into the workforce in Corporate America, I have struggled with the balance between succeeding and increasing in wealth, and maintaining a Christian heart and perspective on all my endeavors. I’ve spent nearly 4 years in the corporate world, and today I was struck by the message I heard this Sunday, often referred to as “Treasure Sunday” in the Coptic Church, and thought about how to apply it to the delicate balance for succeeding in work life and in Christianity, not to the exclusion of either. Continue reading

How much of the Coptic liturgical text today is Greek? I just tallied the number and the results are surprising.

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If you didn’t already know, the Coptic Liturgical text today is filled with Greek. But how much of it is Greek? People have been giving and receiving all kinds of answers to that question, so I set out to get an actual answer. Here are the results, tips on telling the difference, and what the numbers may or may not tell us: Continue reading

“Your crying baby is distracting me at church” — What should the church do?

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Who hasn’t experienced the distraction caused when a young child cries or gets too noisy? From the priest, to the deacons, and all the way down to the people surrounding the father and/or mother with the child, the tension and frustration is almost palpable. The parents too are distracted, not just by their noisy child, but by the emotional disturbance they feel when inundated with all of the varying glances they receive, with all those eyes telling them: “Quiet that child down, or leave.” And if it is deemed a sufficient nuisance to the priest (at least in the Coptic Church), many, if not most, will give the parent the “silent treatment”—that moment in liturgy when the priest stops praying, joining the chorus of dissenters in silence, sending a clear message to the parent(s) in the absence of prayer: “Your baby is distracting me and the entire church. We won’t move on until you’ve done something about it.”

What is the church to do? From the clergy to the lay person attending the service, how has the church historically viewed noise in church, and the place of children? Today, what should be our stance? Continue reading

Get Rid of Coptic? When Coptic Is Not Edifying…

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“We should stop using Coptic in the Coptic Church,” is what I’ve been hearing these days by many. How did we get to this point? Should we stop using the Coptic language in the Coptic Church in the diaspora? Recently His Holiness Pope Tawadros II and previously the late Pope Shenouda III seemed to express support for adapting to new cultures to include allowing no use of the Coptic language (see videos below). I’m curious to get your thoughts.

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When Clergy Fall Short of Our Expectations

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This post is about a circumstance facing many Christian denominations, which the Coptic church is not immune from. But first let me place this in context.

Introduction

The Coptic Church is beautiful in its organization, structure, tradition, depth, and spirituality. But no group of fallible individuals will forever be without fault. Christianity is perfect; its followers are not, and that is okay, because the Christian life is a life of constantly striving towards perfection—towards Christ. So who are we to cast stones at others as if we are not ourselves full of faults? And be aware that sometimes we unfairly cast a negative light on individuals due to our own weaknesses more than theirs. Nonetheless, out of love for our Church, its priests, and its people, necessity bears upon us to cast a light upon matters that need attention. Thus, although we are all subject to weakness, it becomes particularly troublesome (and therefore important to point out) when the Church’s appointed/chosen leaders forget that they are servants at the feet of whom they serve rather than authority figures looking below at their subjects. Continue reading